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5 Tips On Staying Motivated Past The Jump

Steve Harvey encouraged us all to jump. Jump into whatever it is that is your passionate purpose, that fire that burns deep within your core.

Jump.

Or else live a life of what ifs, unfulfillment, the shoulda, coulda, wouldas. Some hear the call, leap, and realize that they are now left with the task of building their wings to achieve the success they dream of.

Being a newbie full time entrepreneur in any industry is exhausting and draining. But it is always worth it.

No dream worth living is easily attained, so if you’re thinking about taking that jump, here are some tips to staying motivated as you build those wings needed to fly.

Maintain A Schedule

From birth we are provided a setschedule to follow. A disciplined regimen that starts from the school day to an eventual 9-to-5, 10-to-7, etc.

When working for yourself, that initial year is a lot like starting your freshmen year of college. There’s no parent to wake you up, boss to report to about a specific project, it is you and you – or perhaps a partner if applicable.

It is important to maintain the same discipline you had for any job for your business. Waking up at the same hour, getting ready, setting a particular space in your house as a work area or traveling to a favorite coffee shop at the same time every day, all are important to ensure that you don’t become lazy simply because you are you’re own overhead.

Organize, Organize, Organize

If you are working from home, again, designate an area in your house to function as your office. This can be your kitchen, living room, or if possible a full office area.

Everyone has their own system to staying organized. Invest in monthly planners that you will use, a calendar to keep track of appointments, utilize apps like Wunderlist to track to-do lists and set deadline reminders.

Keep your coins just as organized using services like Quickbooks to track payments and expenses.

Take A Day Off, Seriously

With a multitude of tasks on your plate, it’s easy to feel like you can’t relax. You shouldn’t relax. Your business doesn’t work unless you do.

Guess what, your business also won’t work if you’re so drained you are unable to conceive a useful thought.

Make sure you treat yourself witha little care – a lot easier said than done. If this means not working on the weekends, incorporating a standing happy hour or lunch date with friends, simply make time to let your brain have a break.

Continue to Learn

No one knows everything. There is always something new to learn that can be useful for your professional and possibly your own personal development.

What you don’t know, ask. Find someone who can share the knowledge or take e-courses that could provide certifications bolstering your resume.

Business people having lunch outdoors

Build Your Network

As an entrepreneur, even when working with a partner, it’s easy to feel alone. It’s easy to assume that no one will understand the anxiety, mental turmoil, confusion, and frustration a new business will bring.

But you are not alone.

Attend meet ups, seek out Facebook groups or podcasts for entrepreneurs. There is a community of entrepreneurs for every niche any and everywhere. You don’t have to feel alone because you work alone.

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About Alley Olivier

Alley Olivier is a Kanye West fan hype off caffeine or Jameson, depending on the time of day. A too-proud Brooklyn, New York native, Alley has two-stepped her pen skills at digital and print publications including KarenCivil.com, Ebony Magazine, and Caribbean Life newspaper. Her greatest accomplishment and No.1 focus is being the managing editor of BrooklynButtah.com - leading a great team and handling all of the site's supporting entities. Freelancing every-so-often, she selfishly keeps her best pieces exclusively for BrooklynButtah. Follow her pursuits for good food, dope experiences, and amazing interviews @AlleyOlivier_ #AlleyPurp

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